Moving Nevada Forward

in support of higher education


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Why I Love Nevada

As part of Moving Nevada Forward we asked people, “Why Do You Love Nevada?”

Personally, I love the gigantic outdoor playground.  I enjoy over 300 days of sunshine, the quality of life, I never tire of the beautiful skies, and this list goes on…

I created this video to capture all of the wonderful things people shared with me, but it only touches the surface of all the reasons we love Nevada.

I want to hear from you.

Please tell me, why do YOU love Nevada?

or visit http://youtu.be/aUJKIM1Kncs


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Become an Overnight Success

success

Do you really believe there is such a thing?

Personally, I like the saying…

It takes twenty years to become an overnight success.”

Eddie Cantor

We often hear about companies or individuals becoming an overnight success, but there is usually more to the story if you dig a little deeper.

Mozart started writing music at age six, however much of his masterwork was not composed until he was 21.

Facebook was founded in 2004 by Mark Zuckerberg, but it didn’t join the Fortune 500 list until 2012.

Apple Inc., started in 1976 and spent many years with rocky sales and a low market share before Steve Jobs returned to the company and became CEO in 1997.  It wasn’t until the introduction of the iPod in 2001 that Apple really started to become what seemed like overnight success.  In 2012, it was the largest publicly traded corporation in the world.  It took 25 years to reach this level of success.

The lead developer of Gmail, Paul Buchheit notes that the success of Gmail was a long time coming.  They started working on it in 2001, and most everyone disliked it.  Even after it was launched insiders were predicting its doom.  Today there is over 400 million active Gmail users and growing.

Even Selena Gomez  had to start somewhere by making her debut on Barney and Friends in 2002.  She didn’t have her first top 10 hit until 2013.

The truth is it takes years to become an overnight success.

Most elite performers follow a process.  In John Maxwell’s book, The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership:

1. Success is like building wealth, it doesn’t happen overnight.  It is created by a steady, day-by-day long term effort.  It takes time to build momentum.

2. Great leaders continually invest in their own self-development.  It’s a life long process that helps you grow and develop.  Many of today’s great leaders have been working on becoming  leader for years.  Maxwell says at 51 he was still waiting, but had been working on it for 30 years.

3. Overnight success is the result of self-discipline, perseverance, and momentum built up over time.  Everyone has to start out as a beginner before they become an expert.  You may not have the knowledge, skills, or abilities in the beginning, but developing a consistent habit of preparation results in greatness overtime.

There really is no such thing as an overnight success.  It is rare.  The mere notion of an overnight success can be misleading,  discouraging and demotivating to most people.  If you are starting something new, you may be a lucky one hit wonder, but you should expect a long journey and hard work along the way.

Don’t give up the dream, just realize that time, preparation, perseverance, positivity are key to your long-term success.

What’s Your Story?  How long did it take you to become an overnight success?


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Do You Have The Happiness Advantage?

If you haven’t seen this TedXBloomington yet with psychologist Shawn Achor you need to take 12 minutes of your to time to stop and watch it.

He does an excellent job at demonstrating the power of a positive attitude.

We believe we should work to be happy, but could we have that backwards? In his research he found that only 25 percent of job successes are predicted by IQ and 75 percent of job successes are predicted by your optimism levels, your social support, and your ability to see stress as a challenge instead of a threat. He explains the absence of disease is not health. To get to health we need to reverse the formula for happiness and success. It is not just about working harder to become more successful. If we think we have to be successful before we can be happy we may never be happy. If happiness is on the other side of success your brain never gets there because our goals keep changing.

Raise your level of positivity. He advocates raising your level of positivity in the moment then your brain will experience what he calls the happiness advantage. When you brain is positive it performs significantly better under stress. Your levels of intelligence, creativity, and energy rise. In his research he found that every single business outcome improves. If your brain is positive it will be 31 percent more productive, 37 percent better at sales, doctors are 19 faster and more accurate. If you have the happiness advantage it can help you better secure jobs, help you keep your job, have greater productivity and resilience, less burnout and lower turnover. If we can find a way to become more positive in the present then our brains work even more successfully. We work harder, faster, and more intelligently.

He suggests ways to train your brain if done for 21 days in a row will rewire your brain to work more optimistically and successfully. In his research he asked clients to try these 5 things or 21 days:

  1. Write down three new things your are grateful for each day
  2. Journal about one positive experience you have had over the last 24 hours
  3. Excercise-as it teaches your brain that your behavior matters
  4. Meditation it allows your brain to get over the multitasking we keep requiring all at once and teaches us to focus on the task at hand
  5. Random acts of kindness-write one positive email each morning praising or thanking somebody in their support network

He ascertains that at the end of the 21 days your brain will scan the world for the positive instead of the negative first and create ripples of positivity.

Quote by Mr. Achor, “{It’s} the lens through which your brain views the world that shapes your reality. And if we can change the lens, not only can we change your happiness, we can change every single educational business outcome at the same time.”

Do you believe you should work to be happy?  Or do you think we might have it backwards?


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All I Really Need To Know About the Workplace I Learned In Kindergarten

A key component of the HR function is employee relations.  It has been said it is one of the core competencies for all HR professionals.  I am sure there are hundreds of books, webinars, and lectures on the topic.  It never ceases to amaze me just how complicated this subject can get with complaints, grievances, posters, lawyers, training, the equal opportunity commission, affirmative action and the list goes on. Perhaps we are over complicating things.  If we spend one-third of our lives at work-don’t we want it to be happy?  Isn’t about taking responsibility for our actions and being good citizens?

Are you a good citizen at work?  Here are some simple reminders from one of my favorite poems by Robert Fulghum, (chock full of sage old advice), “All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten.

Kingergarten

Kingergarten (Photo credit: courosa)

Most of what I really need to know about how to live and what to do and how to be in the workplace I learned in kindergarten.

Wisdom was not at the top of the graduate school mountain, but there in the sandpile at Sunday school.

Wouldn’t the workplace would be a much brighter place if we could all just remember these 16 tips?

Here are some things I learned about how to be a good employee and thrive in the workplace:

  1.  Share everything. We all have to play in the same sandbox–can’t we all just get along?
  2. Don’t hit people.  The workplace is no place for bullies.  Don’t do it.  Please call in sick or find another job.
  3. Put things back where you found them.  Yes, your mother was right.  It is about respect.
  4. Clean up your own mess.  Please spare me the emails.  Just clean it up!
  5. Don’t take things that aren’t yours.  Integrity.  (This includes other people’s jobs.)
  6. Say you’re sorry when you hurt somebody.  Mind your manners and remember to say thank you and sorry!
  7. Wash your hands before returning to work.  Don’t wait for the sign as a reminder as you go out the door.
  8. Flush.  Need I say more?  (It is about out with bad in with the new.)
  9. Warm cookies and cold milk are good for you.  And good for your colleagues too.  Bring enough to share.
  10. Live a balanced lifeMental, spiritual, physical, emotional wellness for the common good.
  11. Learn some and think someEmployee engagement.  There is no such thing as a dumb question.
  12. And draw and paint; sing and dance and play; work some everyday. Work hard.  Play hard.  Take your much needed breaks and lunches for some R & R.
  13. Take a nap every afternoon.  (In your car of course)
  14. But most importantly when you go out into the world watch out for traffic.
  15. Hold hands and stick together.
  16. Be aware of wonder.

I love it!  Even in the workplace we have so much to learn from children.  Find your passion and take responsibility for your own happiness.

What can you do to be a better citizen at work?

What have you done today to be aware of the wonder?   Have you learned something new lately?  Do you say please, thank you, and I am sorry?  Do you work hard?  Live a balanced life?  Remember to draw, paint, sing and play at recess.  Let’s hold hands and stick together.

I think it is time I deliver some cookies and milk.

Milk and Cookies

Milk and Cookies (Photo credit: Cook Jones)